THE IRS MAY TAKE SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS TO SATISFY TAX DEBTS!

To satisfy tax debts, the IRS may levy a taxpayer’s Social Security benefits. However, a provision of the Internal Revenue Code requires the IRS to release levies that cause economic hardship.

An IRS Building.

Social Security Recipients Who Have Tax Debts May Receive a Visit From the IRS!

In addition, taxpayers have the right to claim an exemption against the levy, which allows them to receive a minimum amount of the Social Security payment and prevent all or part of the levy.

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) initiated an audit to determine whether the IRS appropriately applied manual levies to Social Security benefits. IRS Revenue officers make levy determinations of Social Security benefits on a case-by-case basis and exercise judgment in making the determination to levy. While there are special procedures and thresholds for levying Individual Retirement Accounts (IRA) and 401(k) retirement accounts, there are no special considerations or procedures for revenue officers when levying Social Security benefits. In these cases, the revenue officers follow procedures for levying assets in general. In most cases, revenue officers are compliant with these general IRS procedures when levying Social Security benefits. However, for 15 percent of the audit’s sample, TIGTA found that IRS revenue officers took levy action on Social Security recipients that likely caused or exacerbated economic hardship. These levies may be due in part to a change in collection policies that appears to give equal weight to nonlegal considerations (such as whether taxpayers are “cooperative” within the subjective determination of revenue officers) and the legal requirement to release the levy when the IRS determines that the levy is creating an economic hardship for the taxpayer. In these cases, revenue officers could have discerned from the facts that the taxpayers were experiencing economic hardship.

In Addition, while existing procedures allow revenue officers to manually levy up to 100 percent of Social Security benefits, taxpayers have the right to claim an exemption from the levy. However, in 28 percent of the sampled cases, IRS revenue officers used the wrong form to levy Social Security benefits. As a result, the IRS did not consider exemption amounts before establishing the levy. Of these cases, 6 percent involved taxpayers who suffered greater Social Security levies than allowed by law.

The TIGTA believes the IRS needs to adjust its policies and procedures to allow revenue officers, with appropriate discretion, not to levy if facts and circumstances clearly show that taxpayers are in or on the threshold of an economic hardship.

If you would like to see the complete report (ah yes, nice summertime reading), go to: www.treasury.gov/tigta/auditreports/2016reports/201630043fr.pdf.

Is this an example of to much force used by the IRS? Is it misguided?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bruce – Your Host at The Tax Nook

Our Firm’s Website: SolidTaxSolutions.com (or just click on the icon on right sidebar of this page).

Other Social Media Outlets: Facebook.com/SolidTaxSolutions (or just click on the icon on right sidebar of this page).

Twitter: Twitter.com/@SolidTax1040 (BTW, We Follow-Back).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *