Monthly Archives: January 2017

LLCs, S-CORPORATIONS, AND PARTNERSHIPS – THE BASICS: PART 1

Hello All!

Over the past year a number of people who have started a business or contemplated starting a business, have asked me various questions about LLCs, S-Corporations, and Partnerships and which of these forms of ownership is best.

These questions have come to me by way of visits to our office, through this blog, facebook (facebook.com/solidtaxsolutions), or even through twitter (twitter.com/@SolidTax1040). But there was a common denominator among these questions. A lack of understanding of what these entities represent and the responsibilities required by each.

So, I’ve decided to put pen to paper (so to speak) to give a foundation on which business formation and operation decisions can be made.

I’ve decided to break this up into two parts so as not to overwhelm. But keep in mind that the two parts do not represent all that needs to be considered when forming a business or contemplating changing the ‘entity type’ for the business.

So, here we go…………

 

CAUTION

While it’s too early to predict what effect any tax legislation in 2017 will have on S corporations and partnerships, you should be aware that significant changes are possible.

An Introduction

LLCs, S corporations, and partnerships, have been around for some time and are very popular with small businesses. But despite their extensive use, there are still a number of misconceptions among business owners and the entities have their own particular traps. This blog post is not a detailed treatise, and certainly won’t make you an expert. That would take way to many pages. Rather, I’ve tried to assemble a list of misconceptions and traps that I’ve encountered over the years. Many of the basic rules are the same for LLCs, S corporations, partnerships . I’ll point out important differences as I discuss the topic.

Notes:

  • The Middletown company used in the examples below is always assumed to be an S corporation or a partnership or LLC.
  • References to owners can mean either shareholders or partners.
  • LLCs are generally treated as partnerships (Note: An LLC can also have only one member in which there would be a different tax treatment. But for now I will talk about the LLC as if there is more that one ‘owner’, hence partnership treatment).

 

Basic Operation of a Pass-Through Entity

S corporations, LLCs and partnerships are known as pass-through entities. The idea behind a pass-through entity is that the entity doesn’t pay any taxes. Instead, the income and losses and certain separately stated items are passed through to the shareholders or partners and reported on their personal tax returns. That’s the big advantage of a pass-through. If a business operates as a C (regular) corporation, it pays a corporate level tax. Any payments made to the shareholders are taxed again on the shareholder’s personal tax return (therefore a double tax for C corporation shareholders. But I digress). Avoiding the corporate tax can produce substantial savings, depending on the tax level of the corporation. An additional advantage is that accidental constructive dividends (e.g., when the corporation pays for a shareholder’s personal expenses) avoid the double tax. Instead, in the case of a pass-through entity, the deduction is simply disallowed and considered a distribution.

In the simplest situation, the income or losses are passed through to the shareholders/partners. For example, Middletown, LLC has two equal partners, Darren and Fred. For the year it (the partnership) has gross receipts of $250,000 and expenses of $140,000. Of the total net income of $110,000, $55,000 is reported on Darren’s K-1 and the same amount reported on Fred’s K-1. Darren and Fred report the income on their respective Form 1040s.

 

Separately Stated Items

But, it’s often more complicated. Some items are considered to be “separately stated”. Instead of affecting the income or expense of the entity, they’re passed through to the owners separately. For example, Middletown, LLC makes a charitable contribution of $200. Instead of deducting that amount from Middletown, LLC’s income, it’s reported separately on the K-1 to the owners. The owners can take their share of the contribution on Schedule A of their 1040, but only if they itemize. Similarly, interest and dividend income isn’t included in the entity’s gross income, but passed through to the owners and reported on their Form 1040.

Unfortunately, a number of items that you might consider to be business income and expenses are also passed through to the shareholder/partners separately. They include the -Section 179- expense option (writing off equipment purchases), capital gains and losses, gains and losses on the sale of equipment, all credits including the work opportunity, disabled access, energy, foreign taxes, certain special expenses such reforestation expense deduction. Investment expenses, such as portfolio management fees, must also be separately stated.

Rental activities must also be passed through separately. For example, Middletown, LLC’s business is providing advice to manufacturers. Because the partners saw an opportunity to buy a building containing five small offices at an attractive price, they did so. The income and expenses of the rental property are reported on a specific tax form and the net income (or loss) is not reported on Middletown LLC’s return but passed through to the owners.

Tax Tip 1–Problems can arise if the entity has more than one owner and the owners have different tax situations. For example, Middletown, LLC bought raw land as an investment three years ago. Sue and Fred each own 50% of Middletown, LLC. Fred has a large capital gain this year; Sue rarely has investment activity. The land has declined significantly in value and Fred wants to sell it. His share of the loss could be used to offset his gain. Sue can only take $3,000 of the loss this year and carry the remainder forward indefinitely. Passive losses resulting from rentals might be limited by the phase-out of the $25,000 exception for one or more owners, but not for other owners, depending on their individual tax situation. There are other examples.

Tax Tip 2–Using the S corporation or partnership to hold investments, make contributions, etc. can increase the complexity of a return. That will add to preparation cost and make tracking certain items more difficult. While often a minor concern, before complicating your business, make sure there’s a valid reason for doing so. That may be particularly true with respect to rental properties in the business. It is often smarter to hold them in your own name or a separate LLC for both tax and non-tax reasons.

 

Salaries, Distributions, and Business Income

This, unfortunately, could be one of the most misunderstood areas of pass-through entities. More than once I’ve heard a taxpayer say “How could I owe so much money? I didn’t take a salary last year.” Or “I won’t take a salary so I’ll save on taxes”. Here’s were the rules on S corporations and partnerships and LLCs separate.

Basically, whether or not you take anything out of your pass-through entity, the owners will be taxed on all the income. In the case of a partnership or LLC, all the income is taxable as self-employment income. That means you’ll owe the self-employment tax on your share of the income.

An S corporation is just a ‘wee bit’ more complicated. Let us first assume that you take no salary from the corporation. In that case, like a partnership or LLC, all the income of the corporation is still taxable to the owners, but is not subject to the self-employment tax. Before you think you’ve spotted a loophole, you should be aware that the IRS requires corporate officers/employee/shareholders to take a salary. The salary you take will be subject to the usual FICA and Medicare taxes (as well as state and federal unemployment). Your share of the FICA/Medicare is withheld from your salary; the business pays the other half, just as if you were an employee at an unrelated employer.

A couple of examples should make it clearer.

Example 1–Fred is the sole shareholder of Middletown, Inc., an S corporation. Middletown, Inc. needs the cash, so Fred decides not to take a salary during 2016. He takes no distributions from the corporation of any kind. At the end of the year, Middletown, Inc. has a profit of $250,000. On his Form 1040, Fred reports the entire $250,000 of corporate profit as income. Fred has no other items of income, so his adjusted gross income is $250,000. (I assumed no other income to make the examples easier.) Example 2–Sue is the sole shareholder of Chester Inc., an S corporation. Chester, Inc. has excess cash. Sue takes her regular salary $100,000 and a distribution of $60,000. At the end of the year, Chester, Inc. has a profit of $150,000 (after accounting for Sue’s salary). On her Form 1040, Sue reports the corporation’s profit of $150,000 as income and the $100,000 salary as income. The distribution of $60,000 doesn’t enter into the computation. She has no other items of income, so her adjusted gross income is $250,000 ($100,000 in salary plus the $150,000 of Chatham’s profit).

Clearly, either way, the total income from the entities reported by the shareholders are the same. It doesn’t matter how you take the money out, or even if you take it out. The only difference will show up in FICA and Medicare taxes. By taking less of a salary, you can avoid some of these taxes. The flip side is that you’ll have less earned income for funding a pension plan or for other purposes.

There is a situation where you can end up disadvantaged from a tax standpoint.

Example 3–Middletown, Inc. has net income of $20,000 through late December. Fred, a 100% shareholder takes a $50,000 salary that creates a net loss of $30,000 for Middletown, Inc. Fred’s basis (I’ll discuss that later; for now assume it’s his investment in the corporation) is $5,000. Fred can only deduct losses up to his basis. On his personal return he’ll report $50,000 of salary, but can only deduct $5,000 of his loss.

With a partnership or LLC, the results are similar. Leave the money in or take it all out. You’re still taxed on the full amount earned. In addition, you’ll pay the self-employment tax on the full amount either way.

There may be reasons for not taking the money out, such as loan covenants, avoiding contributing funds back to the business for cash flow purposes, etc., but there are no real tax advantages or disadvantages.

 

Hobby Loss Rules

Just because you incorporated or set up an LLC or partnership doesn’t mean you’re immune from the hobby loss rules. The rules prevent taxpayers from deducting losses from activities that are not real businesses. This is rarely an issue if you’ve got an operating business with employees, a storefront, you have one or more years of income despite losses, etc. But if you run the business as a sideline, there are significant recreational elements (e.g., horse boarding, dog breeding), you have consistent losses that are unlikely to be reversed and you don’t carry on the activity in a business like manner (e.g., don’t keep good records, don’t attempt to reverse losses, don’t have professional advisers) you could be in trouble.

If you fall into the latter category (e.g., it’s a sideline) there are a number of steps you can take to insure you won’t have a problem with the IRS.

 

Separate Activities

Tax law requires S corporations, partnerships and LLCs (and sole proprietorships) to break down their businesses into separate activities for purposes of the passive activity rules. (See next.) This could mean that if your S corporation, etc. has more than one activity, you may not be able to use losses from one to offset profits from another. For example, Middletown, Inc. has two businesses. Fred manages and operates a machine shop that rebuilds aircraft engines in Albany, NY. Sue runs Middletown Inc.’s two stores selling kayaks on Cape Cod. Neither Fred nor Sue interfere in the operation of each other’s respective activities. They get together a few hours monthly to review the combined financial statements and provide each other with business advice. Middletown Inc. must account for the businesses separately and losses from the kayak sales can’t be used to offset profits from engine rebuilding.

While this may be an extreme example, the message here is that you should not assume that you can put two completely diverse businesses together so that the losses may be utilized. When do you have to split the business into separate activities? That’s a difficult question that depends on the facts. The IRS will look at five factors–similarities or differences in the types of businesses; extent of common control; extent of common ownership; geographical location; and interdependence between the activities. There’s a good chance you won’t run into the situation. And, fortunately, even if you do, the answer is often obvious. In the example above, there’s no chance this is a single activity. But the operation of a chain of auto repair shops would be a single activity, as would rebuilding aircraft engines and operating an airport.

 

Passive Activities and Material Participation

One of the reasons for the complexity of the rules surrounding S corporations and partnerships stems from the ability to pass through losses to the owners. The uncontrolled use of partnerships (and S corporations to a lesser extent) in the early 1980’s led to restrictions on the use of the losses. Congress wanted to deny losses to passive investors while allowing them to owners who were active in the business. They arrived at the concept of “material participation”. If the owner materially participated in the business (as most small business owners do), the losses could be used to offset other income such as dividends, interest, salaries, etc. On the other hand, owners who did not materially participate (passive investors) could not use these losses to offset other income. They could be used to offset other passive income or used to offset other income when the investment was completed disposed of.

What’s material participation? There are seven tests. Pass any one and you’re in. Most business owners will pass one of these three tests:

  1. You participate in the activity for more than 500 hours during the tax year.
  2. Your participation constitutes substantially all of the participation in the activity of all individuals (including non owners) for the tax year.
  3. You significantly participate in the activity and your total participation in all significant participation activities during the year exceeds 500 hours. The threshold for significant participation is 100 hours.

Most small business owners will pass the first test. But participation counts only if it’s actually managing or working in the business. The second test is available for sidelines or very small businesses. So for example, let’s say that you’re a flight instructor and on trips to various airports you try and sell a line of aviation electronics. You’re the only employee and spend about 300 hours a year at the business. Test 3 is for owners who own a number of businesses and significantly participate in each of them for more than 100 hours a year, but don’t make the 500 hour test for any one business.

Keep in mind that there are four other tests. I’ve found that most small business owners qualify under the three listed above.

If you don’t materially participate in the activity, you can’t currently deduct the losses. The losses are passive and can only be used to offset current or future passive income or on the disposition of the activity. And that’s the reason for the definition of activity. In our example above, Sue can deduct her losses in the kayak activity. Fred can’t. He can only deduct losses incurred in his aircraft engine operation.

What does it all mean? Before you agree to part with a bunch of cash and join your buddies in a new venture, you should thoroughly understand the rules. While it still may be a good deal even if you can’t take any losses currently, you may want to reconsider.

Don’t get hung out to dry with your business, contact Solid Tax Solutions
(SolidTaxSolutions.com)
. It will be worth it.

We can be reached at: (845) 344-1040.

Are you ready for Part 2? Well you can read it right here.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bruce – Your Host at The Tax Nook

Our Firm’s Website: SolidTaxSolutions.com (or just click on the icon on right sidebar of this page).

Other Social Media Outlets: Facebook.com/SolidTaxSolutions (or just click on the icon on right sidebar of this page).

Twitter: Twitter.com/@SolidTax1040 (BTW, We Follow-Back).

The Self-Employment Tax. What is It and How Does it Effect You?

If you’re just beginning business (or even if you have an existing business) as a sole proprietor, a partner in a partnership or a member of an LLC (limited liability company), it’s very important you understand the self-employment tax. Failure to take the tax into account when making your estimated tax payments could result in a substantial penalty. At the very least, you’ll have a big surprise when you file your 1040 in April. If you’re familiar with this tax, you should still read this article. There are plenty of pointers that many taxpayers overlook.

So let’s start off with: What the heck is the Self-Employment Tax? If you’re a sole proprietor or a partner or an LLC member, you are not considered to be an employee. You will receive no W-2 and nothing is withheld from your pay for FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act) or medicare taxes. (If you’re an employee, 7.65% is withheld from your pay and your employer matches that amount, paying a total of 15.3% to the government). In order to collect a similar amount for social security and medicare, a sole proprietor has to pay 15.3% of his self-employment income. The tax is sometimes called SECA (Self-Employment Contributions Act). It’s actually more complicated than that; I’ll get into the details shortly.

Employers will make regular deposits of FICA and other withheld taxes to the IRS. Individual taxpayers who owe the self-employment tax are responsible for paying the FICA and medicare taxes directly to the IRS. That’s done through quarterly estimated tax payments. For most taxpayers that’s April 15, June 15, September 15, and January 15. There’s no separate tax return. Instead, when you file your individual income tax return you must complete Schedule SE (Self-Employment Tax) to compute the tax and report the liability on the back of Form 1040. The self-employment tax is reported separately and added to your individual income tax on Form 1040. Estimated tax payments and withholdings are credited against your total tax liability.

Example: Sue Smith has self-employment income during 2016. The associated self-employment tax is $4,500. Her regular income tax liability for the year will be $3,250. In addition, she withdrew money from an IRA and owes a penalty of $500. She worked a regular job for part of the year and had $1,500 in income tax withholdings. She made estimated tax payments of $3,000. Here’s a computation to show what she owes with the tax return.

	Income tax liability                         $3,250
	Self-employment tax                           4,500
	Early withdrawal excise tax			500
	 Total liability                              8,250
	Less: Withholdings                           (1,500)
	Estimated tax payments                       (3,000)
         Net tax due with return                      3,750

Sue owes $3,750 with her tax return. Even though it’s paid to the IRS, the self-employment tax portion will end up with the Social Security Administration. However, when it comes time to compute the penalty due for tax underpayments during the year, no distinction is made. If you’re in the 15% bracket or the lower portion of the 25% bracket, the self-employment tax can easily be more than your income tax. For example,  lets say that you’re married, no children, take the standard deduction, have $40,000 of net income on your Schedule C and have $3,000 of other income. For 2016 your income tax liability would be about $1,990 (after accounting for a deduction for one-half of the self-employment tax on your income taxes); your self-employment tax would be $5,652.

Detailed computation. While all you need do is complete Schedule SE to figure your tax liability, you should know that the computations aren’t as simple as portrayed above. Keep in mind that the total FICA tax is really made up of two pieces. The first portion is the 12.4% OASDI (Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance). The tax only applies to earnings of $127,200 or less (2017 amount; it’s indexed for inflation). The second portion is for medicare. That’s 2.9% of all your self-employment income or wages. There’s no upper limit on that portion. Beginning in 2013 an additional 0.9% medicare tax is assessed on self-employment income in excess of $200,000 (single) or $250,000 (married filing joint). In an effort to equalize the tax burden of individuals and corporations (who get to deduct their half of the FICA taxes), the calculations involve several steps. Assume in the steps below your net self-employment income is $140,000.

Step 1. The tax isn’t on all of your net earnings. The base is only 92.35% of net earnings. Thus, the base using our $140,000 of self-employment income is $129,290.

Step 2. Only the first $127,200 (2017 amount) is subject to the full 15.3% tax. Thus, multiply $127,200 by 15.3%; the result is $19,461.60. The difference between $129,290 and $127,200 is $2,090. That amount is taxed at only 2.9%, so the tax is $60.61. The total tax is $19,522.21 ($19,461.60 + $60.61).

If your self-employment income was only, say $60,000, you would only have to first multiply by 92.35%, then by the full tax rate, 15.3%.

Step 3. If, during the year, you also received wages or a salary as an employee and your employer withheld FICA, the computations are more complex. Those wages will count toward meeting the wage base. Use the ‘long-form’ on Schedule SE to compute the tax. Thus, if you’ve already had a salary of $127.200 or more, the earnings from your sole proprietorship (or partnership, etc.) would only be subject to the 2.9% medicare tax and the 0.9% additional Medicare tax (when applicable).

Step 4. You can deduct one-half of the self-employment tax on the front page of Form 1040. Using the numbers from our example, that would be $9,761.11. Since this amount reduces your adjusted gross income (AGI), the deduction is worth more than if it were simply an itemized deduction.

When computing your earnings subject to the tax, you’ve got to net your profits and losses from all your business activities that would be subject to the tax. For example, you have $60,000 of self-employment income as a partner and a $35,000 loss from your auto repair shop you run as a sole proprietorship. Your net earnings subject to the tax are $25,000. If you have a net loss, you’re not liable for the tax.

Beginning in 2013 there’s an Additional Medicare Tax of 0.9% on self-employment income (as well as regular wages) on income over $200,000 ($250,000 for a married couple filing jointly; $125,000 married filing separate). For a single individual, computation is easy since there’s only one income. For a married couple the threshold applies to the couple. For example, Wilma has a job in Manhattan and makes $175,000 a year. Fred works in Middletown and makes $50,000. Fred has a side business and made $45,000 in 2014. The couple has a total of $270,000 in earned income and pays tax an additional tax of 0.9% on the $20,000 ($270,000 less the threshold amount of $250,000).

Persons Subject to the Self-Employment Tax. You’re subject to the tax if you were self-employed and your net earnings from that source were $400 or more. (You’re considered self-employed if you carry on a trade or business either as a sole proprietor or partner in a partnership). You don’t have to be in business on a full-time basis. Part-time work also qualifies.

A trade or business is generally an activity carried on for a livelihood or in a good faith attempt to make a profit. While this depends heavily on the facts and circumstances, the IRS wins most of the cases on this issue. There have been a few situations where a taxpayer was able to show he wasn’t in a trade or business, but don’t count on being able to do so. You might be able to show that, for example, you grow fruit for your own consumption. You’ve done so for a number of years and never sold any. Because of crop losses by others in your area, you can sell enough one year to show a small profit. In subsequent years you don’t sell any of your crop. You might be exempt. Get good advice if you’re going to make such a claim.

Special Situations:

  • Inactive partners are subject to the self-employment tax.
  • Limited partners are only subject to the tax on guaranteed payments such as salary and professional fees received for services performed.
  • Retired partners are not subject to the tax on retirement income. However, the amounts received must be under a written plan that meets certain requirements.
  • The income from a single member LLC (treated as a sole proprietorship for federal tax purposes) is self-employment income.
  • The law is not entirely clear on LLC members where the LLC is treated as a partnership. However, guaranteed payments to a member should be considered self-employment income. An LLC member who is active in the LLC should also be considered liable for the self-employment tax on his or her distributive share.
  • Resident aliens are generally subject to the same rules as U.S. citizens. Nonresident aliens generally do not pay the self-employment tax.
  • Executors and administrators of estates may or may not be liable for the tax. You are liable if you’re a professional fiduciary, an attorney, or a nonprofessional fiduciary and your duties require extensive managerial activities on your part for an extended period of time or your fees are related to the operation of the business and you actively participate in the business. If your duties are limited to handling an ordinary estate where any business management is small or nonexistent, then the income is not subject to the self-employment tax.
  • Fishing crew members come under some special rules. Generally, they’re considered self employed if they take a share in the catch.
  • Newspaper carriers and distributors are generally considered independent contractors and subject to the tax. Carriers or distributors and vendors under the age of 18 are not subject to the self-employment tax.
  • Notary public fees are not subject to the tax.
  • Trailer park owners may or may be liable for the tax. The outcome here depends on the amount of services provided to the tenants. Minimal services such as sewerage, water, electrical connections, etc. won’t result in the income being subject to the tax. Substantial services beyond those required for occupancy (such as maintaining a recreational hall, operating a laundry facility, etc.) will make the earnings self-employment income.
  • Director’s fees received in performing services as a director of a corporation are self-employment income.
  • S corporation income distributed to you is not subject to the self-employment tax. However, you can’t avoid the FICA taxes by not taking a salary. If you take no, or too low a salary, the IRS can recharacterize some of the earnings as salary that’s subject to FICA taxes.
  • Your spouse is subject to the self-employment tax if he or she is a partner in your business. You may want to put him or her on the payroll as an employee. That way you withhold FICA taxes and your business pays its portion, just as you would for a regular employee. Talk to your tax advisor about this approach. You may be able to make higher contributions to your pension plan and deduct health insurance premiums.
  • Income subject to the tax. Finding your self-employment income is generally straight forward. It’s the bottom line on your Schedule C. If you’re a partner, you should be able to get the info from your K-1.

Even though associated with the business, some income is not considered self-employment income. For example, gains and losses on the following types of property are not included:

        1. Investment property.
        2. Depreciable property or other fixed assets used in the business.
        3. Livestock held for draft, diary, breeding, or sporting purposes and not held primarily for sale, regardless of how long the livestock were held or whether they were raised or purchased.
        4. Standing crops sold with land held more than one year.
        5. Timber, coal, or iron ore held for more than one year, if an economic interest was retained.

 

      • Income from the sale of property that is stock in trade or held primarily for sale to customers is subject to the self-employment tax.

Example: Middletown Lawns, a sole proprietorship, sells small tractors, lawn mowers, etc. At the end of 2017 it sells some old inventory at a substantial loss. The loss reduces the owner’s self-employment income (the loss is taken on Schedule C).

Example: The facts are the same as in the example above, but Middletown Lawns also owns some equipment that is used only for rentals. Middletown Lawns sells this equipment at a loss. The loss doesn’t reduce the owner’s self-employment income. Similarly, if the equipment were sold for a gain, it wouldn’t increase the owner’s self-employment income.

  • Dividends and interest received on securities are generally not self-employment income. However, interest you receive in your business (e.g., interest on overdue accounts receivable) is part of your self-employment income and subject to the tax. Payments for lost income, such as insurance payments after a casualty to your business, are subject to the tax.
  • Real estate rental income and personal property leased with the real estate is generally not self-employment income. However, if you receive rent as a real estate dealer, the income is included in your self-employment income.
  • Renting personal property (e.g., equipment) generates self-employment income.
  • Hotel or motel income is generally subject to the tax. Whether or not income from a real estate rental or hotel is subject to the tax depends on the facts and circumstances. If you provide substantial services for the convenience of the occupants, not normally provided with the rental of rooms for occupancy only, the income is subject to the self-employment tax. For example, providing maid service for individual rooms would make the income subject to the tax. On the other hand, the cleaning of stairways and lobbies would not.

Optional methods. If your gross income is $2,400 or less you may be able to use an optional method of computing the self-employment tax. You’ve got to meet a number of tests. I won’t go into the details here, because so few people normally qualify. However, you should be aware the method exists. It allows you to pay the self-employment tax if your profit for the year is small or if you have a loss. Why pay more taxes than you have to? Using the method allows you to qualify for social security coverage when you normally wouldn’t. That increases your quarters of coverage. It may also allow you to claim a larger credit for dependent care expenses and the earned income credit.

Estimated tax payments. As discussed, you pay the self-employment tax along with your estimated individual income taxes during the year. The law doesn’t make a distinction. That is, your income tax and self-employment tax are added together and treated as one. The same rules apply. That is, you can usually avoid a penalty if you pay in at least as much as your prior years’ liability. You may be able to reduce your estimated payments by annualizing your income and making payments based on your actual income during the year.

 

So, in closing this particular blog post, let me say that this presentation was an overview of (and primer about) the Self-Employment Tax.

Keep in mind that each business (and the form of ownership that each business takes) is different and has its own Self-Employment Tax ‘details‘.

Solid Tax Solutions (SolidTaxSolutions.com) can help you with ‘Self-Employment Tax’ issues or any other issues concerning your existing business, new business, or business that you are considering.

You can reach us (year-round) at: (845) 344-1040.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bruce – Your Host at The Tax Nook

Our Firm’s Website: SolidTaxSolutions.com (or just click on the icon on right sidebar of this page).

Other Social Media Outlets: Facebook.com/SolidTaxSolutions (or just click on the icon on right sidebar of this page).

Twitter: Twitter.com/@SolidTax1040 (BTW, We Follow-Back).