The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) – Part 5

Hello again everyone and welcome to the fifth installment of our discussion about how the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act can affect you. I hope that you find these articles enlightening.

To start off, if you haven’t read my introduction to the new law, please go to → Tax Cuts and Jobs Act–Part 1.

In this fifth installment I will be continue the discussion about items affecting individuals but with a business slant. There are a number of changes to the provisions applicable to business. Many are straight-forward, some are complex and will require regulations by the IRS to fully implement. I’ll start this discussion with some of the easier ones.

Immediate (Section 179) Expensing of Depreciable Assets

There are a number of ways of treating depreciable tangible personal property and certain other qualifying real property. Taxpayers can expense an asset with a cost of no more than $2,500 ($5,000 for certain taxpayers) under a safe harbor rule. That works well for small items such as laptops, calculators, small tools, etc. largely because it involves less paperwork and follows financial accounting rules. But there are some restrictions. For larger assets Section 179 allows an immediate deduction, but you must make an election to do so. In addition, there’s an income limitation. But it’s still simpler than taking annual depreciation.

Under prior law the Section 179 election was limited to $510,000 (adjusted for inflation) of assets in any one year and that amount was decreased for taxpayers who put more than $2,030,000 of tangible personal property in service during the year. There was a $25,000 restriction on SUVs (not adjusted for inflation) and for property used in connection with certain lodging facilities.

Increased Expensing Limits The new law increases the amount of property that can be expensed in any one year to $1 million and the investment limitation is increased to $2.5 million from $2 million. The higher $1 million limit on qualifying property means many small businesses won’t have to worry about depreciation of most assets. By combining the $2,500 safe harbor for lower-cost assets and the Section 179 option, over $1 million can be written off in any one year.

Tax TipTaxpayers doing business as a pass-through entity (S corporations, partnerships, etc.) may not want to use the full available amount. That’s because of the graduated rates for individuals where the pass-through income is taxed. Taking a large deduction in one year that drops your income into a low bracket only to push yourself into a high bracket in the following year will result in overall higher taxes. You do have some options and you don’t have to decide to depreciate or expense an asset until you file your return.

Qualified Real Property Definition The provision expands the definition of qualified real property eligible for expensing to include certain improvements to non-residential real property placed in service after the date such property was first placed in service. The improvements include roofs, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning property, fire protection and alarm systems and security systems. This change not only allows a direct deduction for such improvements that are often encountered several times during the life of a building and that frequently generated controversy. Qualified improvement property continues to include certain leasehold improvement property, retail improvement property, and restaurant improvements and buildings. As under prior law, qualified improvement property is an improvement on the interior of a building. Modifications that enlarge the building do not qualify. The new law repeals the requirement that the improvement qualifies only if placed in service more than three years after the building is placed in service.

Property Used in Connection with Lodging The provision also expands the definition of Section 179 property to include certain depreciable tangible personal property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with the furnishing of lodging. In the past longer-term lodging such as an apartment was distinguished from lodging such as a hotel, motel, inn, etc. Property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with the furnishing of lodging generally includes beds and other furniture, refrigerators, ranges, and other equipment used in the living quarters of a lodging facility such as an apartment house, dormitory, or any other facility where sleeping accommodations are provided.

Sport Utility Vehicle Limitation The new law changes the rule with respect to the $25,000 limitation on sport utility vehicles such that this amount will be adjusted for inflation. The sport utility rule applies not only to the general definition of a sport utility vehicle but also a vehicle not subject to Section 280F and which is rated at not more than 14,000 pounds gross vehicle weight and has a seating capacity of less than 10 persons or truck with an interior cargo bed shorter than six feet.

 

Bonus Depreciation

Background For a number of years the law has contained a “bonus depreciation” provision, the intent of which has generally been to increase capital investment. Under normal rules, the first years’ depreciation is one-half of double the straight-line rate. The one-half is to account for the fact the property is in service for only a portion of the year. (Property placed in service in January gets 1/2 year of depreciation; so does property placed in service in December.) Bonus depreciation front loads the depreciation deduction even more. Under 50% bonus depreciation you can deduct half the asset’s value in the first year, plus you can take the regular depreciation on the other half. That was the rule in effect prior to the new law.

New Law The new law allows 100% bonus depreciation rather than 50% on property placed in service after September 27, 2017 and before January 1, 2023. Bonus depreciation drops to 80% for property placed in service after December 31, 2022 and before January 1, 2024; 60% in the following year then 40% in the following year and 20% for property placed in service after December 31, 2025 and before January 1, 2027. No bonus depreciation is allowed for subsequent years. Property subject to a written binding contract for its acquisition entered into before September 28, 2017 does not qualify. The placed in service dates for property with a longer production period and noncommercial aircraft are extended by one year. Bonus depreciation applies to both new and used property. (Under prior law it only applied to new property.) Special rules apply to prevent abuse. They include:

  • the property can not have been used by the taxpayer before purchase,
  • the taxpayer must have acquired the property by purchase,
  • the property can’t have been acquired from a related party if loss would be barred under Sec. 267 of the Internal Revenue
    Code.

Qualified leasehold improvement, restaurant property and qualified retail property retains a 15-year depreciation life, but now can be depreciated using MACRS (a faster method) rather than straight-line depreciation and the bonus depreciation rules apply.

The 100-percent bonus depreciation rules do not apply to assets used in a trade or business where the property has had floor plan financing indebtedness.

Bonus depreciation can be taken on qualified film, theatrical productions, or television shows placed in service after September 27, 2017.

Luxury Auto Limits Under Sec. 280F depreciation deductions for vehicles are capped on an annual basis. Under the old law it could take nine years to depreciate a $30,000 auto. The new law changes the limits for vehicles placed in service after December 31, 2017 and for which 100-percent bonus depreciation is taken. The new amounts are:

$10,000 for the first year,
$16,000 for the second year,
$9,600 for the third year,
$5,760 for the fourth and subsequent years.

These amounts will be adjusted annually for inflation.

Farm Assets The new law shortens the recovery period from 7 to 5 years for any machinery or equipment (other than any grain bin, cotton ginning asset, fence, or other land improvement) used in a farming business if the original use of the property commences with the taxpayer and is placed in service after December 31, 2017. The provision also repeals the required use of the 150-percent declining balance method for property used in a farming business (3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-year property only). The 150-percent method will continue to apply to 15- and 20-year property. A farming business electing out of the limitation on the deduction for interest (see later) must use the ADS method of depreciation any property with a recovery period of 10 years or more (e.g., single purpose agricultural or horticultural structures).

Computers Listed property is property of a type that could be used for recreational purposes such as autos, computers, cameras, audio equipment, etc. Computers used in an office environment aren’t included, but those used at home are. In order to secure a deduction for listed property special record keeping requirements apply. That generally means keeping a log. Cellphones were removed from this list a number of years ago. The new law removes this computers and peripheral equipment from the definition of listed property (and the stricter substantiation requirements) effective for property placed in service after December 31, 2017.

Tax TipBeing able to write off the full value of an asset in the first year will maximize cash flow for that year, but it could result in higher taxes down the road. You can elect out of the bonus depreciation for any class of asset for the year. If you do business as a pass-through entity (e.g., S corporation, LLC, partnership, etc.) the income or loss is passed through to the shareholders, partners, etc. and subject to the progressive tax rates. Moreover, you can generally no longer carry back losses to an earlier year. That means you could be getting a current deduction and saving taxes only to put yourself in a higher bracket in a subsequent year. There’s no easy rule of thumb–you’ve got to work through the numbers. You should be looking at making an election if you’re in a lower bracket and the depreciation deduction will be a substantial percentage of your before depreciation income.

Tax TipBuy or lease? It’s a frequent question when it comes to vehicles. Depreciation deductions are capped. Deductions for lease payments are restricted through the lease inclusion amount. But that restriction on lease payments appears to be less than those on depreciation under the old law. The new law may favor purchase and depreciation of an auto, at least for less expensive vehicles. While it’s a point for consideration, the IRS has yet to release the lease inclusion tables for 2018 and there are other factors to take into account when leasing a vehicle for business purposes.

Tax TipWhile the new law removes the stringent record keeping requirements for computers, the IRS can still challenge the business use of any property. You should be able to show that the computer is used regularly in your business. In many cases it’s obvious. Let’s say that you’re an independent salesperson on the road and take and place orders with your office using the computer. That probably won’t be questioned. On the other hand if you have a landscaping business and keep all your records using a paper ledger, you may want to be able to prove the business use in some way.

Solid Tax Solutions is available to help you with preparing your tax return as well as show you how the new tax laws will affect you.

Just give us a call at (845) 344-1040.

☛(845) 344-1040☚

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bruce – Your Host at The Tax Nook

Our Firm’s Website: SolidTaxSolutions.com.

Other Social Media Outlets: Facebook.com/SolidTaxSolutions.

Twitter: Twitter.com/@SolidTax1040 (BTW, We Follow-Back).

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) – Part 4

If you haven’t yet read the introduction to my first article on the new law 😟 (or you would like a refresher), please go and have a look at: → Tax Cuts and Jobs Act–Part 1.

In this 4th installment I am going to continue discussing items affecting individuals.

Recharacterization of IRA Contributions

If you make a contribution to an IRA (Traditional or Roth) for a taxable year, you’re permitted to recharacterize the contribution as a contribution to the other type (Roth or Traditional) by making a trustee-to-trustee transfer to the other type of IRA before the due date for your income tax return of that year. In a recharacterization, the contribution is treated as having been made to the transferee IRA (and not the original, transferor IRA) as of the date of the original contribution. Both regular contributions and conversion contributions to a Roth IRA can be recharacterized as having been made to a traditional IRA. In both cases, the recharacterization essentially undoes the conversion.

The new law repeals the special rule allowing a conversion contribution to a Roth IRA to be recharacterized as a contribution to a traditional IRA, but still allows an original contribution from a traditional or Roth IRA to be recharacterized as a contribution to the other type. That is, recharacterization can no longer be used to unwind a Roth conversion. For example, Ted makes a $5,000 contribution to his traditional IRA in 2018. He can recharacterize that as a contribution to Roth as late as October 15, 2019 (the extended due date of his return). Barbara makes a $5,000 contribution to a Roth IRA in 2018. She can recharacterize it as a contribution to a traditional IRA as late as October 15, 2019. In 2018 Suzanne converts $20,000 of her traditional IRA into a Roth, paying tax on the $20,000 of income. In June 2019 the value of the converted shares declines substantially under the new law she can’t recharacterize (undo) the conversion and is stuck with the consequences.

While not done all that frequently, this change will require taxpayers making a conversion contribution to a Roth to consider their actions carefully since they can no longer be undone. This provision applies to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017.

Qualified 2016 Disaster Distribution

Distributions from qualified retirement plans that occur before the participant reaches age 59-1/2 and don’t qualify for any other exception are generally subject to a 10% early withdrawal tax. Under the new law, an exception to the 10% tax applies in the case of a qualified 2016 disaster distribution from a qualified retirement plan, a Sec. 403(b) plan, or an IRA. In addition, income attributable to such a distribution may be included in income ratably over three years, and the amount of a qualified 2016 disaster distribution may be recontributed to an eligible retirement plan within three years. A qualified 2016 disaster distribution is a distribution from an eligible retirement plan made on or after January 1, 2016 and before January 1, 2018, to an individual whose principal place of abode at any time durng calendar 2016 was located in a 20-16 disaster area and who sustained an economic loss by reason of the events giving rise to the Presidential disaster declaration. Only the first $100,000 of distributions qualify for such treatment.

Rollovers of Plan Loan Offset Amounts

If you take a loan from a defined contribution plan and fail to repay the amount or default on the loan the outstanding balance is income and subject to the 10% early withdrawal tax. If an employee terminates employment their obligation to repay a loan is accelerated and, if the loan is not repaid, it’s canceled and the amount in employee’s account balance is offset by the amount of the unpaid loan balance. The loan offset is treated as an actual distribution from the plan and the amount of the distribution is eligible for tax-free rollover to another eligible retirement plan within 60 days. However, the plan is not required to offer a direct rollover. The new law extends the period during which a qualified plan loan offset may be contributed as a rollover contribution is extended from 60 days to to the due date (including extensions) for filing the Federal income tax return for the taxable year in which the plan loan offset occurs.

Qualified Tuition Program Distributions

The income on contributions made to a Section 529 Qualified Tuition Plan (QTP) are not taxable on distribution if made to pay qualified higher education expenses. Under the new law qualified higher education expenses also include tuition in connection with enrollment or attendance of the beneficiary at a public, private or religious elementary or secondary school. Qualified distributions under this provision is limited to $10,000 per tax year. The $10,000 limitation applies on a per-student, rather than a per-account basis.

The provision also modifies the definition of higher education expenses to include certain expenses incurred in connection with a home school. Those expenses are curriculum and curricular materials; books or other instruction materials; online educational materials; tuition for tutoring or educational classes outside of the home (but only if the tutor or instructor is not related to the student; dual enrollment in an institution of higher education; and educational therapies for students with disabilities.

Rollovers Between Qualified Tuition Programs and Qualified ABLE Programs

A qualified ABLE program is a tax-favored savings program intended to benefit disabled individuals. The program is established and maintained by a State agency or instrumentality. The new law allows for amounts from qualified tuition programs (Section 529) to be rolled over to an ABLE account without penalty, provided that the ABLE account is owned by the designated beneficiary of the 529 account, or a member of such designated beneficiary’s family. Such rolled over amounts count towards the overall limitation on amounts that can be contributed to an ABLE account for a taxable year. Any amount rolled over that is in excess of this limitation shall be includible in the gross income of the distributee.

Filing Thresholds

The requirement to file an income tax return for a citizen or a resident alien is based on a certain income level. The thresholds vary by filing status and age (65 or older) and whether or not a taxpayer is legally blind. The thresholds are adjusted for inflation every year. Because of the increased standard deduction, the filing thresholds are higher for every filing status. The new thresholds (assuming no inflation) for 2018 are:

Single $12,000
for 65 or older or blind add $1,600
for 65 or older and blind add $3,200

Married, filing separate $12,000

Married, filing joint $24,000
one spouse 65 or older or blind add $1,300
one spouse 65 or older and blind add $1,300
both spouses 65 or older or blind add $2,600
both spouses 65 or older and blind add $5,200

Head of Household $18,000
for 65 or older or blind add $1,600
for 65 or older and blind add $3,200

Qualifying Widow(er) (surviving spouse) $24,000
for 65 or older or blind add $1,300
for 65 or older and blind add $2,600

The new law also adds to the due diligence requirement of tax preparers to ensure clients qualify for the education and earned income tax credits the requirement a client qualifies to file as head of household. The penalty for failure to do so is $500.

Estate and Gift Tax

The new law increases the federal estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax exemption to $10 million for the estates of decedents dying and gifts and transfers made after 2017. This provision expires at the end of 2025. Before the adjustments for inflation in the old law, the exemption is doubled. The $10 million amount is also adjusted for inflation. The $10 million amount is essentially doubled for a married couple because of the availability of the Deceased Spousal Unused Exclusion (DSUE). The obvious result is that far fewer taxpayers will have to worry about the estate tax in their financial planning. In 2016 only 4,142 returns were filed with a gross estate that exceeded $10 million and only 2,204 of those contained a tax liability. (Those returns represent decedents who died in earlier years, but the return was filed in 2016.) The step-up in basis rule remains in effect.

A new concern is that the exemption will revert to the lower amount when the new law expires at the end of 2025. Taxpayers who could exceed that lower amount should seriously consider careful estate planning. While making gifts may make sense for estate tax purposes, the basis rules for gifts dictate a carry-over basis rather than a step-up basis. That’s an important consideration. Making gifts to lower generations can make sense with the larger exemption, but the portability exemption does not apply to the generation skipping tax exemption amount of $10 million.

Rollover of Gain on Publicly Traded Securities

Under the prior law, a taxpayer could elect to roll over tax-free any capital gain realized on the sale of publicly-traded securities to the extent of the funds used to purchase common stock or a partnership interest in a specialized small business investment company within 60 days of the sale. There were dollar limits on the amount of the gain that could be rolled over. That provision has been repealed under the new law, effective for sales after December 31, 2017.

Self-Created Property not Capital Asset

Also under the prior law, property created by a taxpayer (whether or not associated with his trade or business) was considered a capital asset and would qualify for long-term capital gain treatment on a sale. Certain items were specifically excluded from favorable treatment such as inventory property, certain self-created intangibles, and property subject to depreciation. Self-created intangibles subject to the exception are copyrights, literary, musical or artistic compositions, letters or memoranda, or similar property which is held either by the taxpayer who created the property, or for whom the property was produced. A taxpayer could elect to treat musical compositions and copyrights in musical works as capital assets.

The new law amends Section 1221(a)(3) of the tax code, resulting in the exclusion of a patent, invention, model or design (whether or not patented), and a secret formula or process which is either held by the taxpayer who created the property or a taxpayer with a substituted or transferred basis from the taxpayer who created the property (or for whom the property was created) from the definition of a capital asset. Thus, gains or losses on such assets will not receive capital gain treatment. The provision applies to dispositions after December 31, 2017.

Whew, that is a lot of information.

What do you think about the new tax law and how it will affect you?

And business owners, I didn’t forget about you. In the next post (i.e., Part 5), I will talk a bit about some of the new tax provisions and how they will affect your business. You can find it right here.  👓

Remember, Solid Tax Solutions is available to help you with preparing your tax return as well as show you how the new tax laws will affect you.

Just give us a call at (845) 344-1040.

☛(845) 344-1040☚

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bruce – Your Host at The Tax Nook

Our Firm’s Website: SolidTaxSolutions.com.

Other Social Media Outlets: Facebook.com/SolidTaxSolutions.

Twitter: Twitter.com/@SolidTax1040 (BTW, We Follow-Back).

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) – Part 3

So, welcome back boys and girls for Part – 3 of how the The Tax Cut and Jobs Act can affect you.

If you haven’t read the introduction to my first article on the new tax law, please go to Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) – Part 1. In this third installment I will continue the discussion of itemized deductions that I started in Part 2 (and you can find Part 2 right here).

 

Gambling Losses

This change is a positive one. The new law makes it clear that losses from wagering transactions includes both the costs of the wagers and other expenses related to the activity of gambling. That could include travel to and from the casino.

 

Charitable Contributions

Charitable contributions that may be deducted in any one year are limited to a percentage of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). The percentage depends on the type of contribution and the organization receiving the contribution. For cash or property that has not appreciated in value, contributions to public charities under the old law were limited to 50% of AGI. Lower percentages apply to capital gain property and contributions to non-operating private foundations. Under the new law, the 50% limit on contributions to public charities is increased to 60%. Under both prior and new law, charitable contributions deductions disallowed because of the 60% limitation in any year may be carried forward five years.

The new law repeals the deduction for payments made to a college or university in exchange for which the payor receives the right to purchase tickets or seating at an athletic event.

Under prior law you did not have to have a contemporaneous written acknowledgment from a charitable organization for contributions of $250 or more if the donee organization reports the contribution to the IRS. This exception to the general rule has been repealed, effective for the 2017 tax year. Thus, if you made a contribution in 2017 of $250 or more, you’ll need a statement from the charity in order to secure a deduction. This provision does not expire.

 

Casualty and Theft Losses

This change could be particularly difficult for taxpayers in the position of having a casualty loss. Under prior law such net losses were deductible if they exceeded 10% of a taxpayer’s Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) plus $100. The same rules apply to casualty losses sustained in a federally declared disaster. Taxpayers in the later situation could deduct the loss on their current year’s return or the prior year. Any net casualty gains (for example, your insurance reimbursement exceeds your tax loss) are taxable. A deduction for such losses could be taken only if you itemized.

Under the new law any personal casualty losses are not deductible unless attributable to federally declared disaster. This provision applies to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017. Personal casualty gains can still be used to offset losses.

The new law changes other rules for 2016 and 2017. Taxpayers who incur a net casualty loss as a result of a federally declared disaster in 2016 or 2017 are subject to a $500 per casualty threshold, but not to the 10% of AGI rule. In addition, a taxpayer can use the loss to increase their standard deduction. That is, they need not itemize to take the deduction.

Because of the 10% of AGI limitation, most taxpayers wouldn’t be able to deduct small casualty losses such as $2,500 in auto damage not covered by insurance because of a deductible. And even under prior law, a $50,000 deductible loss (after the 10% threshold) as a result of a house fire would only result in $12,500 in tax savings for a taxpayer in the 25% bracket, that’s still a significant saving. You may want to check your insurance policies to make sure you’re adequately covered. You should also check your policy for exclusions.

These changes don’t apply to business property.

 

Moving Expenses

Moving expenses were not deductible as an itemized deduction, but toward Adjusted Gross Income. In order to qualify as a deduction, the expenses had to be business related and there was a distance requirement associated with the move. Moving expenses were limited to the cost of transporting household goods and personal effects and to travel to the new residence.

The new law repeals the deduction for these expenses, with the exception of qualified moving expenses of members of the Armed Forces. And they may continue to exclude from income in-kind expenses and exclude from income any reimbursement for the expenses. The move must be related to a military order and a permanent change of station.

In addition, prior law allowed employers to reimburse qualified moving expenses and exclude them from the employee’s income. Under the new law any moving expense reimbursement must be included in the employee’s income–that is included on his or her W-2. Again, the exclusion for members of the Armed Forces continues to apply.

This change could make some employees think twice about switching jobs and moving to another area of the country. It could also make it less attractive to relocate an employee. Of course, an employer can still reimburse for the moving expense, but it would be taxable income. Thus, reimbursing an employee $4,000 for his moving expenses would increase his income by that amount and result in additional taxes. For example, for an employee in the 24% bracket that would result in additional $960 for just federal income taxes. An employer could “gross up” the payment, in effect paying the taxes (that creates more income for the employee, but makes him whole for his taxes). But, of course, that increases the cost to the employer.

 

Alimony and Separate Maintenance Payments

For many years the rule was that alimony and separate maintenance payments were deductible by the payor and income to the recipient. However, in order to qualify as alimony, the payments had to meet certain requirements. Many taxpayers tried to deduct property settlements or child support as alimony. A poorly worded divorce decree could cloud the issue and often resulted in tax litigation.

Under the new law alimony and separate maintenance payments are no longer deductible by the payor or income to the payee. The new rules don’t apply to existing agreements, but only to ones executed or modified after December 31, 2018. Changes made in the agreement after 2018 are considered modifications only if the modification expressly provides that the amendments made apply to such modification.

Tax professionals and attorneys crafting divorce agreements and taxpayers need to take the new rules into account. The new law will change the calculus of computing settlements. It won’t be possible to create a situation where a payor in a high bracket secures a substantial deduction while a spouse in a lower bracket has the income. In short, there’s less of a chance the government will be helping to finance a divorce.

 

Qualified Bicycle Commuting Reimbursements

Under prior law up to $20 per month of employer reimbursements for qualifying bicycle commuting expenses were excludable from the employee’s income. The reimbursements applied to a 15-month period. Qualifying expenses included the purchase of a bicycle, repair and storage. The new law repeals the exclusion for these reimbursements beginning with taxable years after December 31, 2017.

 

Like-Kind Exchanges

Generally, and an exchange of property for other property is, just like a sale for cash, a taxable event. However, for many years Section 1031 has allowed like-kind exchanges. In a like-kind exchange no gain is recognized on the exchange unless you receive unlike property in return. For example, Hector exchanges a two-family rental property for a strip mall. He receives no other property in return. He reports no gain (or loss) on the exchange. Now assume Fred receives both the strip mall and a backhoe used to maintain the property. At least some of the gain will be taxable. Gain isn’t avoided; it’s just deferred until the property received in the exchange is finally sold. In order to qualify the two properties must be of like-kind and the property must be held for productive use in a trade or business or for investment. (In addition, Sec. 1031 does not apply to stocks, bonds, notes, interests in partnerships, certain exchanges of livestock or foreign property). In addition, there are strict time requirements for identifying the replacement property and consummating the transaction. In the case of tangible property the definition of like-kind has been strictly interpreted. Thus, a car for a car is a like-kind exchange; a truck for a car is not. That’s generally not true for real estate. You can exchange vacant land for an office building and secure Sec. 1031 treatment.

Under the new law, like-kind exchange treatment will only apply to real property. The old law continues to apply to property relinquished or the replacement property is received on or before December 31, 2017. The 45-day identification period and requirement that receipt of the property must occur within 180 days applies.

While the most of the big dollar amounts in like-kind exchanges involve real estate, far more transactions probably involve tangible personal property. Every time you trade in a business vehicle, machinery, or other equipment you’re most likely doing a like-kind exchange. That means you’re deferring any gain on the exchange of the equipment; you’re also deferring any loss. Under the new law you’ll have to recognize gain, or loss, each time you “trade in” equipment. Because of changes in the depreciation rules, that may not make any difference, at least for federal tax purposes.

Example–Oak Inc. purchases a backhoe for $40,000 in 2018 and writes off the entire purchase price. In 2020 Oak Inc. trades in the backhoe for a small bulldozer costing $45,000 paying an additional $10,000 (it’s equivalent to selling the old backhoe for the amount allowed on the trade in, $35,000). The backhoe has been fully depreciated so the trade in produces a gain of $35,000 ($45,000 for the new unit less the $10,000 additional payment). Oak Inc. should be able to write off the full cost of the bulldozer offsetting the $35,000 gain with a $45,000 deduction.

Certain problems can arise. First, the depreciation allowed for state purposes may not be the same as for federal. Second, if the sale and purchase of the two machines occur in different years, there will be no “offset” and Oak Inc. could have a significant a gain in one year and a big deduction in the next.

Having to recognize any loss on a trade in may be advantageous, but not always.

You should talk to your tax adviser —> Solid Tax Solutions before engaging in significant trade ins or other activities that can be affected by the Tax Cut and Jobs Act.

BTW, you can find the next installment of this highly informative series – Part 4 right here.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bruce – Your Host at The Tax Nook

Our Firm’s Website: SolidTaxSolutions.com.

Other Social Media Outlets: Facebook.com/SolidTaxSolutions.

Twitter: Twitter.com/@SolidTax1040 (BTW, We Follow-Back).